Truth or Fiction?


Sometimes the only way to tell the truth is with fiction.

Ever heard that one?

Aside from our suspicions that some of our politicians often use fiction in their speeches and other communications, but don’t really understand what my creative writing instructors meant with that sentence, the older I get the more I’ve come to believe my instructors knew of what they spoke.

Truth is stranger than fiction is another one that makes more and more sense as I get more and more candles on my birthday cake.

Just read somewhere that the two great teams in our country’s constant tug of war will never appreciate the achievements of the other team no matter what the facts are.  We have reached the point where a political moderate is hated by both conservatives and progressives.  Note: I much prefer “progressive” to “liberal,” because in today’s world the very word’s presence in the discourse produces the sort of expression one can only duplicate upon discovering the bite or drink just taken was of rotten substance.  Eeeww!  Spit that out!

Here is a list of statements made in a fairly recent book.  Fiction or  non-fiction?  You be the judge (and please read it through before looking at the answer at the end).

“…we must embrace certain truths which separate a compassionate society from one that is selfish and complacent:

“That racial discrimination still exists, and that we need the courage to challenge it, and to end it.

“That gay men and women are not on a crusade to change the behavior of others, and that protecting them from violence and discrimination is moral, not immoral.

“That guns are too available, and kill far too many people.

“That too many children are denied proper medical care and a proper education.

“That too many of their parents are trapped in dead-end jobs.

“That too many lives are warped by violence, inside and outside our families.

“That too much of our prosperity is built of low wages and shattered dreams.

“That, in the end, we are a family, charged by decency and self-interest to care about every American….”

“…How can we inspire trust…when the best we can say for ourselves is that the other party’s worse?  No wonder people are fed up.”

“…It’s about freedom, the special interests say.  But how many of us are ‘free’ to spend ten thousand dollars to influence a political party?

This is the freedom to corrupt, and it is slowly destroying our democracy.

“Ending it…is a moral imperative.  And the beginning of the end is a constitutional amendment which says, ‘Nothing in the Constitution shall prohibit Congress from passing laws to regulate the funding of campaigns for federal office.”

Fiction or non-fiction?

See “No Safe Place,” by Richard North Patterson, pages 305-307, Random House, 1998 (paperback copy).

It’s a political thriller by a great talent telling the truth with fiction.

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